grassrootspeace.org

November 5, 2007: This website is an archive of the former website, traprockpeace.org, which was created 10 years ago by Charles Jenks. It became one of the most populace sites in the US, and an important resource on the antiwar movement, student activism, 'depleted' uranium and other topics. Jenks authored virtually all of its web pages and multimedia content (photographs, audio, video, and pdf files. As the author and registered owner of that site, his purpose here is to preserve an important slice of the history of the grassroots peace movement in the US over the past decade. He is maintaining this historical archive as a service to the greater peace movement, and to the many friends of Traprock Peace Center. Blogs have been consolidated and the calendar has been archived for security reasons; all other links remain the same, and virtually all blog content remains intact.

THIS SITE NO LONGER REFLECTS THE CURRENT AND ONGOING WORK OF TRAPROCK PEACE CENTER, which has reorganized its board and moved to Greenfield, Mass. To contact Traprock Peace Center, call 413-773-7427 or visit its site. Charles Jenks is posting new material to PeaceJournal.org, a multimedia blog and resource center.

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Contents - Archives - War Crimes - GI Special - Student Activism - Links

War on Truth  From Warriors to Resisters
Books of the Month

The War on Truth

From Warriors to Resisters

Army of None

Iraq: the Logic of Withdrawal

See Resources on Ill-Equipped US Troops, Massive Delayed Gulf War Casualties and Depleted Uranium

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/108673_uranium14.shtml

Seattle Post-Intelligencer
February 14, 2003

Peace activist convicted of trespassing At recruiting center, she tried to warn of depleted uranium

By M.L. LYKE SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER

*The activist, 66-year-old Ellen Murphy, received a $150 fine and a year's non-supervisory probation.
*She was not allowed to present information about depleted uranium in court to support her case, but she was able to testify about her reason for her actions, saying that she felt a "deep devotion" to veterans and enlisted men.
*The defense claimed the Gulf War left that country a "toxic wasteland" of radioactive depleted uranium rounds.
*Judge Debra Lev did allow Douglas Rokke, an Army Reserve major and former member of the crew that cleans up depleted uranium left from Operation Desert Storm, to testify for the record, but not before the jury.
*Rokke also testified that he intends to nominate Murphy for a civilian commendation from the secretary of defense for the demonstration.

BELLINGHAM -- A peace activist who attempted to explain the dangers of depleted uranium inside an Armed Forces Recruitment Center last fall was found guilty yesterday of trespassing.

The quick guilty verdict followed a three-day jury trial that drew media attention to the issue of the radioactive heavy metal, used in munitions to pierce armored vehicles during the Gulf War. Experts say the radioactive dust inhaled after an explosion can lead to various cancers and birth defects.

The activist, 66-year-old Ellen Murphy, received a $150 fine and a year's non-supervisory probation.

She was not allowed to present information about depleted uranium in court to support her case, but she was able to testify about her reason for her actions, saying that she felt a "deep devotion" to veterans and enlisted men.

The court was crowded with some five dozen of her supporters each day. Some carried peace signs.

Murphy and her attorneys had intended to talk about her efforts to keep would-be recruits from signing up and being shipped to Iraq.

The defense claimed the Gulf War left that country a "toxic wasteland" of radioactive depleted uranium rounds.

Prosecutors argued that the Army and depleted uranium were not on trial.

Judge Debra Lev did allow Douglas Rokke, an Army Reserve major and former member of the crew that cleans up depleted uranium left from Operation Desert Storm, to testify for the record, but not before the jury.

Rokke, who flew in from Illinois, told the court that his own uranium poisoning had been kept from him for two years.

He talked about the lack of information provided recruits.

Rokke also testified that he intends to nominate Murphy for a civilian commendation from the secretary of defense for the demonstration.

In final arguments yesterday, prosecutors said they wanted to send a message that protesters will not be allowed to break the law in Bellingham.

Murphy's attorney, Joe Pemberton, said he is considering an appeal.

"I feel like Bellingham has returned to the approach of the early 1960s by classifying people with the label 'protesters' and trying to 'teach them a lesson.' That scares me."

P-I reporter M.L. Lyke can be reached at 425-252-2215 or m.l.lyke@seattlepi.com

Page created February 18, 2003 by Charlie Jenks.