The Great Rutgers Walkout

May 9th, 2007

The Great Rutgers Walkout!!!
By: Ian Chinich
New Brunswick, New Jersey
March 20, 2007

At Rutgers University today, business was not as usual. At 1:30 pm students started filing out of their campuses to join the antiwar rally going on at the Vietnam memorial to mark the fourth anniversary of the war. The approximately 400 students who showed up completely dwarfed the counter protesters (including several members of the black leather jacket wearing rolling thunder group that showed up). One group of students walking out carried a sign that said “Historians opposed to history repeating”

Energy was really high as the United Black Council and CASA speakers rallied the crowd around issues like Black and Latinos fighting in the war and racism. Suzan Sanal and Erik Straub of Rutgers Against the War and Tent State respectively engaged the crowd about the costs of the war on Americans and the lack of money being spent on domestic programs like education. Arwa Ibrahim, an Iraqi American student speaker of BAKA (Belief Awareness Knowledge and Activism) gave the Iraqi perspective of the occupation. Afterwards, two veterans spoke. The first, former captain Chad Hetman, was interrupted from a counter chant of “USA USA” to which he replied, “To the couple of you yelling USA…it reminds me of when the Italians used to yelled IL DOUCHE… Its funny how you claim to be opposed to fascists but you are fascists!!!” His comment brought laughter and cheering. Keith Krebs talked about his former colleague in Rutgers ROTC who had been responsible for torture in Abu Ghraib and how Rutgers ignored this fact.

Then an announcement was made because the next speaker was a gold star mother. That did not stop a couple of counter protesters from yelling at Sue Niederer as she spoke about the pain caused by her son’s death. She called out the counter protesters and there was instant silence in the whole crowd. After repeatedly asking one counter protester to come forward, he did. He told her “I was in Iraq!” The antiwar vets countered with “where were you stationed?”

He responded with “well, I was in Kuwait.” The crowd laughed and Sue continued. After her heart wrenching speech, another veteran called upon everyone to march on the recruiting station, “We are going for a little walk…I want to see everyone here march on the marine recruiting station on George street. For those few people here that are in favor of the war, I will walk with you to help sign you up when we get there!”

A march ensued behind a large banner that said “Students End the War” and a small contingent of anarchists with drums and whistles playing music. Hundreds of students marched on the Marine Recruitment Station and chanted over the complaints of the angry recruiters working there. After several chants and speeches, everyone decided to march on route 18 along the road, shutting down much of the traffic. Police just watched as the hundreds of students continued to make their way along, eventually returning up George Street towards the university president’s office. Finally the march ended back at the Vietnam memorial where groups gave more speeches including a campaign to stop a Homeland security program being funded at Rutgers to root out un-American activity on the web.

Students stayed for several more minutes chanting and mingling even after the next group of classes was letting out. The energy was fantastic and it was the largest walkout at Rutgers since the Vietnam War. We encouraged participants to help us campaign against the war and we got many interested people to sign up on our list serves. POWER TO THE PEOPLE!!!!!

June 29 – students support war resister Lt. Ehren Watada

June 30th, 2006

Report on the event organized by the Campus Antiwar Network and Not In
Our Name in NYC for the national day of action supporting war resister
Lt Ehren Watada on Tuesday:

We had over 50 people outside the Chambers St military recruiting
station in New York, engaged in a number of activities. Many handed
out hundreds of fliers about Lt Watada. Some collected messages of
support for him; over 60 people walking by stopped to write him
postcards expressing their support for his stand, and others signed
petitions. We chanted in front of the recruiting station (chants such
as “They’re our brothers, they’re our sisters, we support war
resisters”) and received considerable support from passersby, both
drivers and pedestrians.

One of the benefits of the postcards — printed specially for the
action, reading “Thank you for saying NO to war in Iraq,” with a peace
sign in the NO and space for people to write their own message — was
that it gave people going by something concrete that they could do to
express their antiwar feelings and make a difference to someone who is
taking a brave stand against the war. This, along with the inspiration
of Lt Watada himself, helped to counter the sense that many antiwar
people have that there is nothing that they can do that will make a
difference. Some people who signed postcards were also students at
Borough of Manhattan Community College, an overwhelmingly working
class and non-white school a block from the recruiting station, who
signed up to get involved with CAN. Since we have tons more postcards
(we ordered a lot in the hopes that there will be many more war
resisters!), perhaps they will want to organize another, similar
action outside the same recruiting station or on their campus.

The mood was summed up well at the end when, during a wrap-up
discussion between participants of what we had accomplished, someone
pointed out that the support we are showing Lt Watada will also raise
the confidence of other soldiers to do the same thing. At that point,
one woman turned to the recruiters — who had been standing outside
their station watching us the whole time — and said, “If you decide
to resist later on, then we’ll support you too.”

- Elizabeth Wrigley-Field
CAN coordinating committee / NYU student

Defend Texas antiwar students in trouble

May 4th, 2006

Traprock Homepage
Campus Antiwar Network

*** please forward and circulate widely ***

ANTIWAR STUDENTS NEED YOUR HELP

Rally: Stop the Attacks on Antiwar Student Organization
Friday, May 5, 10:00 AM
University of Texas Campus, SSB building

The Campus Antiwar Movement to End the Occupation (CAMEO), an student antiwar group at the University of Texas, is being charged with infractions of the UT student organization code, including chalking on campus sidewalks, putting a poster on the MLK statue telling people where to go for a rally with Cindy Sheehan, using amplified sound in an unauthorized location, and having non-student organizations on campus. These are attacks on free speech; what the administration is saying is, “You can have a rally, but be quiet and don’t advertise for it.”

Change has never happened by people being quiet. If the university punishes CAMEO, they may not be able to have rallies or put fliers up on campus. Given that these “rules” are violated every day by various campus organizations, it seems the university is targeting CAMEO because of its political stance and activism.

Support student activists !

Call the Student Activities and Leadership office at (512) 232-2835 — or e-mail the officials below — and ask that all charges be dropped. You should ask for either Cindy Braly, Annemarie Seifert, or Margaritta Arrellano.

And come to the rally on Friday, which is being timed to coincide with CAMEO’s disciplinary hearing.

Cindy Braly, Student Affairs Administrator, cbraly@mail.utexas.edu
Annemarie Seifert, Dean of Students office, aseifert@mail.utexas.edu
Margaritta Arrellano, Associate Dean of Students, arellano@mail.utexas.edu

CAMEO had its last meeting of the semester on May 3rd. More info: antiwarcampus@yahoo.com

From Protest to Resistance: CAN’s East Coast Conference Report

May 4th, 2006

Traprock Homepage
Campus Antiwar Network

Report from CAN’s
EAST COAST STUDENT ANTIWAR CONFERENCE
Held in New York City, April 29-30

by Steve Jackson (UMD), Heather Squire (Brooklyn College), and
Elizabeth Wrigley-Field (NYU), with help from Wes Hannah (Cornell)

See photos and video coming soon at

http://www.campusantiwar.net/

The theme of the conference was FROM PROTEST TO RESISTANCE: REAL
STRATEGIES TO END THE WAR IN IRAQ, and indeed one of the main
schievements of the conference was to begin to answer what kind of
resistance and strategy will be needed to end the war – and how the
organizing CAN chapters are doing today is a contribution to that.
Students who came to the conference left with a greater sense of
relevance, inspiration and clarity to continue organizing over the
summer and come back to our campuses with a bang this fall.

== Demonstrating against the war ==

The conference kicked off with a massive CAN contingent for College
Not Combat, Troops Out Now in the April 29 protest march. Hundreds of
students from all over the Northeast joined in an unbelievably lively,
energetic, chanting and dancing contingent. Because of the massive
size of the overall march (UFPJ estimates 300,000), we were stuck for
an hour and a half in one spot waiting to begin the march, yet the
energy never waned.

The most popular chant of the day seemed to be our new chant, “1-We
are the students, 2-We hate recruitment, 3-We will not join the mil-i-
tar-y!” (To wrap up our conference on Sunday we did it with the
variation “2-This is our movement.”) Other popular chants included
some continuing favorites about troops out now, and “Make levees not
war! What the hell are we fighting for?”, contributed by a wonderful
group of high school students who joined us.

Throughout the march, we were enthusiastically recognized by
passersby, who seemed genuinely thrilled to see such a large, lively
student contingent. This was echoed by the excitement of CAN members,
many of whom remarked that “It’s like our September 24 contingent all
over again.” [See report from that contingent on CAN's website:
http://www.campusantiwar.net ]

== Our Generation Says No! CAN and IVAW plenary ==

On Saturday evening, the conference presented a panel to an audience
of 85 activists (about 75 of whom were students) at the Borough of
Manhattan Community College, featuring 5 students with unique
experiences resisting the war in Iraq. The students included: Anuradha
Bhagwati, of Harvard University, Benjamin Eagle-Staton, of the Borough
of Manhattan Community College, Tariq Khan, of George Mason
University, Jose Vasquez, of CUNY graduate center, and Elizabeth
Wrigley-Field, of NYU, all of whose contributions to the conference
were educational and inspiring. Each panel participant brought a
different perspective on the war in Iraq, as well as intriguing
insight into U.S. foreign and domestic policy.

Noteworthy was the presence of the Iraq Veterans Against War
contingent, who co-sponsored the plenary and brought considerable
energy and enthusiasm to the discussion. Jose Vasquez and Anuradha
Bhagwati, their representatives on the panel, brought many issues to
light critical to understanding the present social uproar seen in
cities nationwide and the growing anti-war sentiment within the
military.

For instance, Anuradha Bhagwati spoke about the pressures within the
military that restrict dissenting voices, they include peer pressure
and the internal guilt of “abandoning” your fellow troops. Jose
Vasquez described seeing pictures of the torture at Abu Ghraib, and
his realization that he identified more with the tortured prisoners
than the soldiers. Thus, he vowed he would never be deployed there,
which has led to his seeking CO (Conscientious Objector) status while
his unit deploys there, and his work to form a grassroots chapter of
IVAW in NYC. Their sentiment was crucial and inspiring to hear because
so often we as students and activists lose morale due to varying
forces. However, their presence buoyed our spirits and re-emphasized
that our actions are not in vain. Together as students and soldiers we
can do more than any of us can do alone.

Another moving speaker was Tariq Kahn, an experienced anti-war
activist, who described his past activist efforts and subsequent
abuse. In September, after peacefully protesting military recruiters
on his campus he was attacked and arrested. However, with the support
of his fellow students and activists nationwide, the charges were
dropped. His example is further evidence that we are not alone. We are
a part of a social movement that spreads nationwide and together we
can stop this unjust war.

Benjamin Eagle-Staton spoke about racism and colonialism, linking the
dehumanization of Muslims and the violence against Iraqis to racism
and police brutality against African-Americans and others in the
United States. Elizabeth Wrigley-Field argued that what students do on
our campuses and in communities can affect whether soldiers buy into
the government’s racist explanations for their suffering, or turn
against the war itself; and that our activism can raise the confidence
of soldiers, as well as Arabs and Muslims, to actively oppose the war
despite the pressures on all of them to stay silent.

Evident from the cohesion of the groups (students, activists, Muslims,
soldiers) was an underlying emphasis on the potential contributions we
all can make to the withdrawal from the Iraq war. Just as those who
participated in the 1960’s civil rights movement, we too are making
our voices heard regardless of how it may seem. Together we can make a
difference and we are making a difference. Evidence of the theme of
solidarity could be seen in the cohesiveness of the panel despite
their different ideologies. People of varying backgrounds came
together to discuss, encourage, inspire, and stand united against the
war.

== Organizing the student antiwar movement ==

If Saturday’s amazing contingent and plenary helped show that building
a grassroots movement — in our schools and in the military — is
possible, Sunday’s workshops reminded us why it is necessary. The
three workshops — Is there a civil war in Iraq?, Will there be war
with Iran?, and Reflecting on our movement for free speech — made it
clear that if we do not organize ourselves to stop it, we can expect
our government to bring ever greater brutality and violence to Iraq,
to spread this violence across the Middle East and around the world,
and to suppress any attempt to stop them, even if it means blatant
violations of our rights.

The civil war workshop raised many important questions about how
widespread the ethnic sectarianism in Iraq is, why sectarian violence
has increased over the course of the occupation, how the US occupation
relates to earlier periods in Iraqi history, the attitude the US
antiwar movement should take toward Iraqi politics, and what role our
movement can play in creating a better life for Iraqis.

The workshop on Iran discussed why the U.S. has its sights on Iran,
the likelihood of different forms of military attack, and what our
movement can do to prevent this tragedy from taking place. This
produced much discussion among the whole conference later in the day
about the place of Iran in CAN’s organizing.

Finally, the free speech workshop brought together CAN’s history of
defending students from repression with a necessary discussion about
how to continue this work in the future. Kicked off by students who
themselves faced repression this year, the discussion centered on
learning from what worked in defending them — and beginning to plan
how we can go on the offensive and defend our rights pro-actively, as
well as continuing to react as new instances of repression come up.
This also furthered our commitment to restarting the national free
speech working group, in addition to starting a new working group to
research our universities’ connections to the war.

After the workshops and conference-wide discussions on the U.S. plan
for the Middle East and the organizing we’re doing on campuses, we
took up proposals to vote on. We passed three proposals with
overwhelming support. The first was to call for emergency student walk-
outs in the case of an attack on Iran. This item had already been
passed by both the West and Mid-West conferences so now it has
national CAN endorsement. We discussed the possibility of a slow
escalation or summer attack in Iran, in which case a walk-out might
not be as effective or viable. In light of this, the need for
alternate forms of action regarding Iran will need to be discussed in
the near future. The second item we passed, also endorsed by the
Western and Mid-Western conferences, was to support the May 1
immigration protests and boycott. The need to make the connections
between xenophobia and war, and immigrant oppression and military
recruitment, was also emphasized within this item. The third proposal
we passed was an endorsement of Camp Casey in August, which would
include our commitment to sending CAN members there this summer. A CAN
member from Texas, who raised this proposal, is helping to organize
student participation in Camp Casey.

Students from about 20 schools as far away as Texas participated in
the organizational and discussion components of the conference, with
many more marching with CAN but unable to stay due to prior travel
arrangements. Many dozens of students from around the Northeast signed
up to get involved with CAN — some already organized into peace and
justice groups at their schools, others hoping for help in getting
something started. Coming out of a year where CAN has experienced real
growth, with new chapters and many new activists leading our
organization, this conference showed us that our active core can
continue to grow — and that the organizing we’re doing on every
school today, whether big or small, is contributing to the growth of
the grassroots movement that will ultimately be what stops the war.

Steve, Heather, Elizabeth and Wes are members of CAN’s national
coordinating committeee. Steve and Heather are the two newest members,
voted on at the East Coast CAN conference.

Campus Antiwar Network

http://www.campusantiwar.net/

Students Speak Out Against the War

April 22nd, 2006

Traprock Homepage
Campus Antiwar Network

Our Generation Says No!

Students Speak Out Against the War
Saturday, April 29 — 5:00 PM
following the anti-war march

As part of the
FROM PROTEST TO RESISTANCE:
REAL STRATEGIES TO END THE WAR IN IRAQ
East Coast Student Antiwar Conference,
come to a historic panel featuring 5 students with unique stories to tell about why they are resisting the war in Iraq:

ANURADHA BHAGWATI, a student at the Kennedy School of Government and a member of Iraq Veterans Against the War. She also co-founded the Palestine Awareness Committee at her school.

BENJAMIN EAGLE-STATON, a student at the Borough of Manhattan Community College and a leader in the BMCC Muslim Students Association. He has spoken out against the war and the racist attacks on Muslims, Arabs and immigrants.

TARIQ KHAN, a student at George Mason University and a veteran of the U.S. Air Force who was assaulted and arrested for peacefully protesting military recruiters on his campus. A student-led activist defense campaign led to the charges against him being dropped.

JOSE VASQUEZ, a student at the CUNY Graduate Center and the President of the NYC chapter of Iraq Veterans Against the War. He is a conscientious objector who is helping to build a grassroots movement of soldiers against the war.

ELIZABETH WRIGLEY-FIELD, a student at NYU and a member of the national coordinating committee of the Campus Antiwar Network. She writes frequently about counter-recruitment and student activism, and has spoken around the country and at the 2006 World Social Forum in Venezuela.

Sponsored by the Campus Antiwar Network and Iraq Veterans Against the War – NYC.
To cosponsor, email CANconferenceNYC@gmail.com

Saturday, April 29 at 5 PM
Auditorium, Borough of Manhattan Community College
199 Chambers St.
Subway: 1/2/3/A/C/E to Chambers
Or walk over from Foley Square after the protest (very close!)

This plenary is part of the “FROM PROTEST TO RESISTANCE: REAL STRATEGIES FOR ENDING THE WAR IN IRAQ” East Coast Student Anti-War Conference, sponsored by the Campus Antiwar Network.

Over the past year, the student movement has won tremendous victories: kicking military recruiters off a dozen campuses, successfully preventing students at nine schools from being expelled for peaceful protest, and much more. Yet we also face enormous tasks ahead of us, as the U.S. government makes it clear that it intends to stay in Iraq for years to come — and maybe even to spread the war to Iran. This conference is a chance for students from around the East Coast to come together to discuss the highlights, successes and challenges of our movement — and how we can build a true resistance that will bring the troops home now!

To participate in the conference, join us earlier on Saturday, April 29 for a “College Not Combat!” student contingent in the March for Peace, Justice and Democracy, then come to the “Our Generation Says No!” plenary in the evening, followed by an informal party. On Sunday April 30, join us at Teacher’s College at Columbia University for workshops, discussions of the successes and challenges of the student antiwar movement, and student organizing sessions.

For more information, visit

http://www.campusantiwar.net

or email us at
CANconferenceNYC@gmail.com

CAN Weekend Conference details.

Open letter from the antiwar movement to SFSU President Corrigan

April 19th, 2006

President Robert A. Corrigan, Ph.D.
San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94132

(415) 338-1381
corrigan@sfsu.edu

Dear Dr. Corrigan:

On Friday, April 14 ten SFSU students protested military recruitment at the university’s career fair. Campus police interrupted their protest and physically took the students from the school’s gymnasium where they were protesting. The police then notified the students that they were banned from campus.

You officially confirmed the ban that same day, and the campus chief of police notified students that if they returned to campus prior to April 28th, they would be “subject to immediate arrest.” When the students called to request a hearing, they were told they would have to wait until May.

We were glad to hear – for the sake of the students – that you withdrew the ban three days later, on Monday. Several students who lived or worked on campus became instantly homeless or unemployed by your arbitrary action. At this point, the students are waiting for the other shoe to drop, as they have heard no word as to whether disciplinary proceedings will come next. Students report that the university waited over a week to notify students of charges against them in a previous situation.

The world has witnessed a full display of intimidation tactics by SFSU against the students, from rough behavior when the police physically removed nonviolent students from the career fair, to your serving notice on them that they were banned — without a prior hearing — from campus for 2 weeks. Any pretense of due process was thrown out the window when your office informed them that they could not have a hearing until after their banishment ended. Now, they face the prospect of discipline. And for what?

They distributed anti-military recruitment leaflets, talked to recruiters and potential recruits, and chanted phrases such as, “Killing Iraqis is no career! Recruiters are not welcome here!” We understand that the chants were loud, but that the students were peaceful and committed to nonviolence.

We also understand that the police aggression came as a shock to the students, who hadn’t planned to get arrested or cited, and who were not given any warning prior to detainment. Reportedly, police rapidly lined up in front of the students, intimidated them and began physically pulling students out of the career fair. Students say that this behavior breached a police policy against mishandling students.

This incident at SFSU has come at a time when students nationwide are facing oppression for protesting this academic year. We have heard of the recent incident at UC Santa Cruz where police roughed up two female students who were leaving at the end of the protest. Earlier this academic year, student protesters were threatened with serious discipline at Holyoke Community College (MA), George Mason University (VA), Kent State University, Wisconsin at Madison, Hampton University (VA), and Pace University (NY). In each case, the university backed down in the face of an international outcry against repression of peaceful protests against war and military recruitment. Such an outcry is building now concerning SFSU’s actions.

As the students have pointed out, SFSU is a university with a legacy of protests, starting with the student strike of 1968. The 10 students with Students Against War, a chapter of the Campus Antiwar Network (CAN), were exercising their rights to free speech and carrying forth the proud tradition of students before them.

Indeed, this is not the first time SFSU has sought to suppress the speech of its students dissenting from recruitment to the war in Iraq. Just over a year ago, on March 9, 2005, according to “A New Battleground on Campuses” by Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, a member of CAN’s national coordinating committee, “200 students rallied against recruitment on campus in protest of the war and the discriminatory Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, ultimately driving recruiters out of the campus career fair with their peaceful chanting and placards. The SFSU administration then decided to single out two student groups (among the six sponsors) and three students for disciplinary action.” Both student groups were put on probation and had their funding eliminated. The three students, meanwhile, have never had their cases resolved – with SFSU neither disciplining them, nor being willing to forgo its claim to discipline them in the future for their protest last spring. The lack of punishment so far may be attributable to the international outrage provoked by the case, as well as a sister case on the same day, where three students and a staff member at City College New York (CCNY) were assaulted by campus security, arrested, and banned from campus during a peaceful protest against military recruiters at their career fair. The community response to both cases led to the CCNY administration, and the New York District Attorney’s office, dropping all charges.

Let’s not forget what these students – “the SFSU 10?” – were protesting. They were protesting the military’s recruiting students into ‘careers’ that would foster death, destruction and injustice. They were trying to protect their fellow students from serious risks of their being among the tens of thousands of US troops killed, maimed or traumatized in Iraq. They were trying to protect students from participating in war crimes – a war in which 100,000 or more Iraqis have been killed, according to the peer reviewed Lancet study; a war in which the US uses uranium, a radioactive neurotoxin, in munitions; a war in which 1 in 4 combat marines admitted to having killed a civilian, with 8 in 10 having reported seeing injured women or children whom they were unable to help (Boston Globe, July 1, 2004).

These horrors and crimes are not cited in military recruitment materials. Instead, students are fed lies about military careers and benefits.

If anything, the protesters should be praised. You should be joining them in condemning recruitment that enables the continued occupation and destruction of Iraq. You should support students who are trying to protect their peers from the untold physical and mental risks of war, whether it’s this one or the one that the US is planning against Iran. You should be proud of students who will not condone hate against their peers by a homophobic and sexist military.

Further, SFSU professes to be part of and to care about the Bay Area community. Do you care what your community thinks about the war and military recruitment? As Bonnie Weinstein of the Bay Area United Against the War has pointed out in a letter to you, in November, 2005, the voters of San Francisco voted to stop the war in Iraq and to bring troops home immediately, and they voted to get the military out of San Francisco schools. And, in the San Francisco Unified School District, 95 percent of parents signed the district’s Opt-Out form, making it clear that they don’t want the military in contact with their children. As she wrote in her letter, “the least that all school administrations could do is actively fight the No Child Left Behind Act and stand in full support of all those who protest the militarization of our schools and the ongoing presence of the military whenever they show up.”

We stand in defense of the SFSU protesters and call on you to take no disciplinary action against them and to apologize to them for violating of their civil liberties and human rights. We believe the university should also compensate any of the group who may have become homeless or otherwise suffered economic hardship because of the SFSU actions. And we invite you to join us as we renew our efforts to build the movement to end this war, bring all the troops home now, and institute reparations for the people of Iraq.

Sincerely,

the undersigned:*

Ahmed Shawki, editor, International Socialist Review and board member of the National Council of Arab Americans;
Alan Maass, editor of Socialist Worker newspaper;
Annie and Buddy Spell, Covington Peace Project_Covington, LA;
Anthony Arnove, author, “Iraq: The Logic of Withdrawal,” co-editor with Howard Zinn, “Voices of a People’s History of the US;”
Bonnie Weinstein, Bay Area United Against War;
Brandon King, student organizer who faced repression at Hampton University (Virginia);
Brian Kelly, student organizer and victim of repression; Pace University Campus Antiwar Network and Students for a Democratic Society;
S. Brian Willson, J.D., LL.D._Member, coordinating Committee, Humboldt Bay Veterans For Peace, Arcata, CA;_Commissioner, Arcata City Nuclear Free Zone and Peace Commission;
Camilo Mejia, war resister who spent six months in military prison for refusing to return to Iraq;
Carolyn Fuller, Senior Analyst/ Programmer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
Charles Jenks, Chair of Advisory Board, Traprock Peace Center;
Charles Peterson, member of the International Socialist Organization and student victim of repression at Holyoke Community College;
Charlie Jackson for Texans for Peace;
Christopher Schwartz, Co-president of the UNI Students for Social Justice; Coordinating Committee member of the Campus Anti-War Network (CAN); President of Cedar Valley United for Peace & Justice; Publisher of The Legacy; Editor and Chief of College Not Combat; Organizing Committee of the Midwest Social Forum;
Cindy Sheehan, co-founder of Gold Star Families for Peace and mother of Casey Sheehan, who died in Iraq;
Dahr Jamail, indepdendent journalist;
David Rovics, progressive songwriter and musician;
Dave Stratman, Editor, NewDemocracyWorld.com;
David Swanson, co-founder, AfterDowningStreet.org, DontAttackIran.org;
Denis Halliday, former UN Assistant Secretary General who resigned in protest as the UN’s Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq;
Dennis Kyne, Gulf War veteran and activist;
Dirk Adriaensens, coordinator of SOS Iraq and member of the Executive committee of the Brussells Tribunal;
Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, NYU, national coordinating committee of Campus Antiwar Network;
Eric Ruder, writer, Socialist Worker;
Gabriele Zamparini, independent filmmaker, writer and journalist living in London; co-producer with The Cat’s Dream;
Hans-Christof von Sponeck, former UN Assistant Secretary General who resigned in protest as the UN’s Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq;
Jacob Flowers, Director, Mid-South Peae and Justice Center, Memphis;
John Robinson, student organizer who faced repression at Hampton University (Virginia);
Hadi Jawad, Crawford Peace House;
Judy Linehan, MFSO mother of Iraq War Veteran;
Kathy Kelly, Voices of Creative Nonviolence;
Katrina Yeaw, SAW/CAN at San Francisco State University, studying in Italy;
Kelly Dougherty, co-founder Iraq Veterans Against the War;
Kevin Ramirez for the Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors and Military Out of Our Schools-Bay Area;
Kristin Anderson, student organizer, SAW/CAN, SFSU;
Lindsey German, convener, Stop the War Coalition (UK);
Marc Herold, Professor, Departments of Economics and Women’s Studies, University of New Hampshire;
Medea Benjamin, cofounder, Global Exchange and CODEPINK;
Michaelann Bewsee, Director, Arise for Social Justice (MA);
Michael Smith, Bay Area activist; a founding member of the Campus Antiwar Network who faced campus repression as a member of the “Berkeley 3;”
Natylie Baldwin, Mt. Diablo Peace & Justice Center;
Nick Mottern, National Director of Consumers for Peace, ExxonMobil War Boycott;
Nikki Robinson, student organizer, KSAWC/CAN, Kent State University;
Norman Solomon, author of “War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death;”
Paola Pisi, professor of religious studies (Italy) and editor of uruknet.info;
Pav Akhtar, Convenor, NUS (UK) Internationalism Campaign;
Phil Gasper, Chair, Department of Philosophy & Religion, Nortre Dame de Namur University;
Josey Foo for San Juan Peace Network (New Mexico);
Sanford Russell, veteran and moderator of BoycottUS yahoo group;
Sara Flounders, International Action Center co-director;
Sharon Smith, author of “Women and Socialism: Essays on Women’s Liberation;”
Sheila Rosenthal, Lafayette Area Peace Coalition (Indiana);
Sunny Miller, Executive Director, for Traprock Peace Center;
Tariq Khan, George Mason University student and Air Force vet assaulted and arrested for peaceful protest;
Dr. Thomas Fasy, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine;
Thomas F. Barton, editor of “GI Special;”
Tim Carpenter, National Director, Progressive Democrats of America;
Todd Chretien, Green Party candidate for U.S. Senate in California;
Valley Reed, March to Redeem the Soul of America, Texas;
Vicky Steinitz, Associate Professor (retired), U Mass/Boston;
Ward Reilly, SE National Contact – Vietnam Veterans Against the War, Veterans for Peace, Baton Rouge;
Wes Hannah, Cornell University, Campus Antiwar Network national Coordinating Committee;
William McAvinney, Information Architect, MIT

*Affiliations are for identification purposes only, except as indicated.

Open Letter from the antiwar movement to SFSU President Corrigan

April 19th, 2006

Please sign the open letter on-line

President Robert A. Corrigan, Ph.D.
San Francisco State University
1600 Holloway Avenue
San Francisco, CA 94132

(415) 338-1381
corrigan@sfsu.edu

Dear Dr. Corrigan:

On Friday, April 14 ten SFSU students protested military recruitment at the university’s career fair. Campus police interrupted their protest and physically took the students from the school’s gymnasium where they were protesting. The police then notified the students that they were banned from campus.

You officially confirmed the ban that same day, and the campus chief of police notified students that if they returned to campus prior to April 28th, they would be “subject to immediate arrest.” When the students called to request a hearing, they were told they would have to wait until May.

We were glad to hear – for the sake of the students – that you withdrew the ban three days later, on Monday. Several students who lived or worked on campus became instantly homeless or unemployed by your arbitrary action. At this point, the students are waiting for the other shoe to drop, as they have heard no word as to whether disciplinary proceedings will come next. Students report that the university waited over a week to notify students of charges against them in a previous situation.

The world has witnessed a full display of intimidation tactics by SFSU against the students, from rough behavior when the police physically removed nonviolent students from the career fair, to your serving notice on them that they were banned — without a prior hearing — from campus for 2 weeks. Any pretense of due process was thrown out the window when your office informed them that they could not have a hearing until after their banishment ended. Now, they face the prospect of discipline. And for what?

They distributed anti-military recruitment leaflets, talked to recruiters and potential recruits, and chanted phrases such as, “Killing Iraqis is no career! Recruiters are not welcome here!” We understand that the chants were loud, but that the students were peaceful and committed to nonviolence.

We also understand that the police aggression came as a shock to the students, who hadn’t planned to get arrested or cited, and who were not given any warning prior to detainment. Reportedly, police rapidly lined up in front of the students, intimidated them and began physically pulling students out of the career fair. Students say that this behavior breached a police policy against mishandling students.

This incident at SFSU has come at a time when students nationwide are facing oppression for protesting this academic year. We have heard of the recent incident at UC Santa Cruz where police roughed up two female students who were leaving at the end of the protest. Earlier this academic year, student protesters were threatened with serious discipline at Holyoke Community College (MA), George Mason University (VA), Kent State University, Wisconsin at Madison, Hampton University (VA), and Pace University (NY). In each case, the university backed down in the face of an international outcry against repression of peaceful protests against war and military recruitment. Such an outcry is building now concerning SFSU’s actions.

As the students have pointed out, SFSU is a university with a legacy of protests, starting with the student strike of 1968. The 10 students with Students Against War, a chapter of the Campus Antiwar Network (CAN), were exercising their rights to free speech and carrying forth the proud tradition of students before them.

Indeed, this is not the first time SFSU has sought to suppress the speech of its students dissenting from recruitment to the war in Iraq. Just over a year ago, on March 9, 2005, according to “A New Battleground on Campuses” by Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, a member of CAN’s national coordinating committee, “200 students rallied against recruitment on campus in protest of the war and the discriminatory Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, ultimately driving recruiters out of the campus career fair with their peaceful chanting and placards. The SFSU administration then decided to single out two student groups (among the six sponsors) and three students for disciplinary action.” Both student groups were put on probation and had their funding eliminated. The three students, meanwhile, have never had their cases resolved – with SFSU neither disciplining them, nor being willing to forgo its claim to discipline them in the future for their protest last spring. The lack of punishment so far may be attributable to the international outrage provoked by the case, as well as a sister case on the same day, where three students and a staff member at City College New York (CCNY) were assaulted by campus security, arrested, and banned from campus during a peaceful protest against military recruiters at their career fair. The community response to both cases led to the CCNY administration, and the New York District Attorney’s office, dropping all charges.

Let’s not forget what these students – “the SFSU 10?” – were protesting. They were protesting the military’s recruiting students into ‘careers’ that would foster death, destruction and injustice. They were trying to protect their fellow students from serious risks of their being among the tens of thousands of US troops killed, maimed or traumatized in Iraq. They were trying to protect students from participating in war crimes – a war in which 100,000 or more Iraqis have been killed, according to the peer reviewed Lancet study; a war in which the US uses uranium, a radioactive neurotoxin, in munitions; a war in which 1 in 4 combat marines admitted to having killed a civilian, with 8 in 10 having reported seeing injured women or children whom they were unable to help (Boston Globe, July 1, 2004).

These horrors and crimes are not cited in military recruitment materials. Instead, students are fed lies about military careers and benefits.

If anything, the protesters should be praised. You should be joining them in condemning recruitment that enables the continued occupation and destruction of Iraq. You should support students who are trying to protect their peers from the untold physical and mental risks of war, whether it’s this one or the one that the US is planning against Iran. You should be proud of students who will not condone hate against their peers by a homophobic and sexist military.

Further, SFSU professes to be part of and to care about the Bay Area community. Do you care what your community thinks about the war and military recruitment? As Bonnie Weinstein of the Bay Area United Against the War has pointed out in a letter to you, in November, 2005, the voters of San Francisco voted to stop the war in Iraq and to bring troops home immediately, and they voted to get the military out of San Francisco schools. And, in the San Francisco Unified School District, 95 percent of parents signed the district’s Opt-Out form, making it clear that they don’t want the military in contact with their children. As she wrote in her letter, “the least that all school administrations could do is actively fight the No Child Left Behind Act and stand in full support of all those who protest the militarization of our schools and the ongoing presence of the military whenever they show up.”

We stand in defense of the SFSU protesters and call on you to take no disciplinary action against them and to apologize to them for violating of their civil liberties and human rights. We believe the university should also compensate any of the group who may have become homeless or otherwise suffered economic hardship because of the SFSU actions. And we invite you to join us as we renew our efforts to build the movement to end this war, bring all the troops home now, and institute reparations for the people of Iraq.

Sincerely,

the undersigned:*

Ahmed Shawki, editor, International Socialist Review and board member of the National Council of Arab Americans;
Alan Maass, editor of Socialist Worker newspaper;
Annie and Buddy Spell, Covington Peace Project_Covington, LA;
Anthony Arnove, author, “Iraq: The Logic of Withdrawal,” co-editor with Howard Zinn, “Voices of a People’s History of the US;”
Betsy Corner, Wmass activist and tax resister, she was a subject of the documentary film “An Act of Conscience;”
Bonnie Weinstein, Bay Area United Against War;
Brandon King, student organizer who faced repression at Hampton University (Virginia);
Brian Kelly, student organizer and victim of repression; Pace University Campus Antiwar Network and Students for a Democratic Society;
S. Brian Willson, Humboldt Bay Veterans For Peace; Arcata (CA) Nuclear Free Zone and Peace Commission;
Camilo Mejia, war resister who spent six months in military prison for refusing to return to Iraq;
Carolyn Fuller, Senior Analyst/ Programmer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology;
Charles Jenks, Chair of Advisory Board, Traprock Peace Center;
Charles Peterson, member of the International Socialist Organization and student victim of repression at Holyoke Community College;
Charlie Jackson for Texans for Peace;
Christopher Schwartz, Co-president of the UNI Students for Social Justice; Coordinating Committee member of the Campus Anti-War Network (CAN); President of Cedar Valley United for Peace & Justice; Publisher of The Legacy; Editor and Chief of College Not Combat; Organizing Committee of the Midwest Social Forum;
Cindy Sheehan, co-founder of Gold Star Families for Peace and mother of Casey Sheehan, who died in Iraq;
Dahr Jamail, indepdendent journalist;
David Rovics, progressive songwriter and musician;
Dave Stratman, Editor, NewDemocracyWorld.com;
David Swanson, co-founder, AfterDowningStreet.org, DontAttackIran.org;
Denis Halliday, former UN Assistant Secretary General who resigned in protest as the UN’s Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq;
Dennis Kyne, Gulf War veteran and activist;
Dirk Adriaensens, coordinator of SOS Iraq and member of the Executive committee of the Brussells Tribunal;
Dorinda Moreno, hitec aztec communications co-moderator, indyiraqaction, central coast diversity alliance;
Elizabeth Wrigley-Field, NYU, national coordinating committee of Campus Antiwar Network;
Ember Swift, Canadian musician and activist, her band is Few’ll Ignite Sound
Eric Ruder, writer, Socialist Worker;
Gabriele Zamparini, independent filmmaker, writer and journalist living in London; co-producer with The Cat’s Dream;
Hans-Christof von Sponeck, former UN Assistant Secretary General who resigned in protest as the UN’s Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq;
Jacob Flowers, Director, Mid-South Peae and Justice Center, Memphis;
John Robinson, Hampton University Black Campus Progressives, he and others faced repression for protesting at the university;
Hadi Jawad, Crawford Peace House;
Josey Foo for San Juan Peace Network (New Mexico);
Judy Linehan, MFSO mother of Iraq War Veteran;
Kathy Kelly, Voices of Creative Nonviolence;
Katrina Yeaw, SAW/CAN at San Francisco State University, studying in Italy;
Kelly Dougherty, co-founder Iraq Veterans Against the War;
Kevin Ramirez for the Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors and Military Out of Our Schools-Bay Area;
Kristin Anderson, student organizer, SAW/CAN, SFSU;
Lindsey German, convener, Stop the War Coalition (UK);
Lon Burnam, Executive Director, Dallas Peace Center;
Marc Herold, Professor, Departments of Economics and Women’s Studies, University of New Hampshire;
Medea Benjamin, cofounder, Global Exchange and CODEPINK;
Michaelann Bewsee, Director, Arise for Social Justice (MA);
Michael Letwin, New York Labor Against the War;
Michael Smith, Bay Area activist; a founding member of the Campus Antiwar Network who faced campus repression as a member of the “Berkeley 3;”
Natylie Baldwin, Mt. Diablo Peace & Justice Center;
Nick Mottern, National Director of Consumers for Peace, ExxonMobil War Boycott;
Nikki Robinson, student organizer, KSAWC/CAN, Kent State University;
Norman Solomon, author of “War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death;”
Paola Pisi, professor of religious studies (Italy) and editor of uruknet.info;
Pav Akhtar, Convenor, NUS (UK) Internationalism Campaign;
Phil Gasper, Chair, Department of Philosophy & Religion, Nortre Dame de Namur University;
Randy Kehler, veteran of the peace movement and co-founder of the Traprock Peace Center (1979), the National Nuclear Weapons Freeze Campaign and the Working Group on Electoral Democracy;
Sanford Russell, veteran and moderator of BoycottUS yahoo group;
Sara Flounders, International Action Center co-director;
Sharon Smith, author of “Women and Socialism: Essays on Women’s Liberation;”
Sheila Rosenthal, Lafayette Area Peace Coalition (Indiana);
Sunny Miller, Executive Director, for Traprock Peace Center;
Tariq Khan, George Mason University student and Air Force vet assaulted and arrested for peaceful protest;
Dr. Thomas Fasy, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine;
Thomas F. Barton, editor of “GI Special;”
Tim Carpenter, National Director, Progressive Democrats of America;
Todd Boyle, Washington Truth in Recruiting;
Todd Chretien, Green Party candidate for U.S. Senate in California;
Valley Reed, March to Redeem the Soul of America, Texas;
Vicky Steinitz, Associate Professor (retired), U Mass/Boston;
Ward Reilly, SE National Contact – Vietnam Veterans Against the War, Veterans for Peace, Baton Rouge;
Wes Hannah, Cornell University, Campus Antiwar Network national Coordinating Committee;
William McAvinney, Information Architect, MIT

*Affiliations are for identification purposes only, except as indicated.

SFSU students back but disciplinary proceedings expected

April 19th, 2006

Traprock Homepage

The SFSU administration has allowed the ten back on campus, but further discipline is expected.

Please Call and email The President and Dean of Students to demand that no further disciplinary actions be brought against the students or any student groups.

Robert Corrigan, president
ofc phone: (415) 338-1381
email: corrigan@sfsu.edu

J.E. (Penny) Saffold, Dean of Students
ofc phone: (415) 338-2032
email: psaffold@sfsu.edu

Updated Summary of Events, 4/18/06
On Friday, April 14th, students at SFSU entered the campus career fair in response to the presence of military recruiters. All students seeking to enter were required to surrender heir student ID card. These student protesters were allowed in despite the fact that they were carrying visible signs. Upon entering, the students saw that the administration had already set up a rope line in front of the recruiters’ table.

Several students removed themselves from the line and began chanting and holding up their signs about 20 feet from the recruiters’ table. The students were in no way blocking access to the recruiters or disrupting the career fair except for slightly raising the noise level of the room. About 45 minutes later Jack Brewer, the director of the career center along with at least ten campus police officers surrounded the students and told them they were disrupting the career fair. The officers then began forcibly removing the students. Not all of the students being removed were chanting and holding signs.

Three students were physically grabbed by the arm, including one woman who was grabbed by two officers. The students were singled off from each other by the officers and told they were being detained. The officers said they were being “626ed,” a reference to the section of the California penal code that they were being cited under. One student was told that we were detained for violating California Penal Code 415 (“Disturbing the Peace”). The police told students they would not be allowed on campus for up to 14 days. Some students were told 7 days, others, 10, but most of them were told not to come back to campus for 14 days. The officers asked for ID and took down the students’ information. Several of the students were then coerced into signing a small white card. When they asked what it was they were being told to sign, the officers said that the signature signified that the students understood that ‘permission to remain on campus was revoked.’ It is important to note that not all the students were asked to sign it nor did all the students receive an explanation.

The students were detained until they had been written up. Some of the students were unable to get back their IDs while others were allowed to retrieve theirs. The students were then escorted off campus by the campus police.

On Monday, the ten students held a press conference right outside the University on 19th Ave. Two TV stations and several newspapers were there. A few hours later one of the students returned home to find a letter from the campus police stating that the President of the University had approved the citations and if anyone was caught off campus, they would be arrested. It has come to light that the administration actually instructed the campus housing staff to prevent two of the 10 students from going to their homes on campus. These students were made effectively homeless over the weekend for fear of being arrested, and could not eat at pre-paid dining facilities on campus.

Several hours after the Monday press conference all the students received emails from the Dean of Students, J.E. (Penny) Saffold, that the 626 violation was being “modified” so that the ten students could freely return and spend time on campus without fear of arrest.

This is of course a fantastic development that we should attribute directly to our press conference and the support of people all over the country. However, we know from past experience that the administration WILL seek further disciplinary actions for individuals and student organizations, particularly Students Against War (SAW) – a chapter of the Campus Antiwar Network – who is under threat of being disbanded for violating ridiculous University policies which protect military recruiters over students who were simply speaking out against war and its perpetuation on SFSU’s campus.

Last year Students Against War (SAW) and the International Socialist Organization (ISO) were sanctioned by the University for their involvement in a much larger demonstration which effectively drove the military from the Campus. Three individuals were singled out for disciplinary action as well, but with the help of the NLG, the proceedings against individuals were effectively stalled and have not resulted in any actions against the students.

The SFSU administration has a history of silencing dissent and will not tolerate any form of protest that actually poses a challenge to injustice on this campus. We have to show them that there is massive opposition to their attempts to stifle free speech.

SFSU students banned from campus after protest

April 17th, 2006

Campus Antiwar Network

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FRIDAY, April 14, 2006

Contact: Karen Knoller, kknoller@sfsu.edu

STUDENTS AT SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY DETAINED BY POLICE FOR CHANTING “MILITARY RECRUITERS GO HOME!”

Press Conference: Monday, April 17, 2006, 11:00 AM
SFSU, 19th Ave & Holloway Ave, San Francisco

Ten students were forcibly removed today from the gymnasium at San Francisco State University for protesting military recruiters on campus. The students were cited by University Police for disrupting campus activities. Their activities included distributing anti-military-recruitment leaflets, talking to recruiters and potential recruits, and chanting phrases such as, “Killing Iraqis is no career! Recruiters are not welcome here!”

The chants were loud but students were peaceful and committed to nonviolence. The police aggression came as a shock to the students, who hadn’t planned to get arrested or cited, and were not given any warning prior to detainment. Police rapidly lined up in front of the students, intimidated them and began physically pulling students out of the career fair, in an apparent breach of police policy against manhandling. This is typical of campus police who have had a recent history of assaulting members of the SFSU campus community.

Students were cited with violation of CA Penal Code 626.4, which restricts [bars] students from coming onto campus for fourteen days. They have fourteen days to appeal the citation, but the University is blocking students from entering the appeals process by claiming they are booked until mid-May. This comes at a time when students nationwide are undergoing oppression for protesting, including students at University of California Santa Cruz, whose protest Tuesday forced recruiters to pack up early and leave their campus.

Students Against War [a chapter of the Campus Antiwar Network], an antiwar student group not rooted in any political ideology, organized the pre-rally and speakers and faces possible disbandment depending on today’s events. This is because they are under preexisting sanctions for the protest that occurred March 9, 2005, in which students effectively chased recruiters off campus.

“I feel completely repressed and violated because I was forcibly removed for expressing my right to free speech and protest,” said Karen Knoller, SFSU freshman who was cited. “In addition to being barred from my classes, I have also effectively been made homeless, as I currently live in campus housing.” Knoller and two other students cited at SFSU, largely a commuter school, also live on campus.

“What am I going to do? I have a paid apartment on campus and I can’t go to it. Am I paying them so I can just sit on 19th and Holloway?” asked Chris Velasco, student at San Francisco State University. “I have a right to protest. My brother is in Iraq fighting.”

SFSU is a university with a legacy of protests, starting with the student strike of 1968. The students demand that they be allowed to practice their rights to free speech and their right to protest, and that they be allowed back on campus to attend classes, visit their dorms and attend their antiwar meetings.

The students will be holding a press conference at the intersection of 19th Avenue and Holloway, just outside the university, 11:00 AM on Monday, April 17. At this event, students will discuss their legal defense and the appeals process to the university.

###

This violation of the free speech of students at SFSU is outrageous!
Call or email President Corrigan and demand that the 10 students
suspended today be allowed back on campus!

President Robert Corrigan
(415) 338-1381
corrigan@sfsu.edu

SFSU students banned from campus after protest

April 16th, 2006

Campus Antiwar Network

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FRIDAY, April 14, 2006

Contact: Karen Knoller, (818) 554-5382, kknoller@sfsu.edu

STUDENTS AT SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY DETAINED BY POLICE FOR CHANTING “MILITARY RECRUITERS GO HOME!”

Press Conference: Monday, April 17, 2006, 11:00 AM
SFSU, 19th Ave & Holloway Ave, San Francisco

Ten students were forcibly removed today from the gymnasium at San Francisco State University for protesting military recruiters on campus. The students were cited by University Police for disrupting campus activities. Their activities included distributing anti-military-recruitment leaflets, talking to recruiters and potential recruits, and chanting phrases such as, “Killing Iraqis is no career! Recruiters are not welcome here!”

The chants were loud but students were peaceful and committed to nonviolence. The police aggression came as a shock to the students, who hadn’t planned to get arrested or cited, and were not given any warning prior to detainment. Police rapidly lined up in front of the students, intimidated them and began physically pulling students out of the career fair, in an apparent breach of police policy against manhandling. This is typical of campus police who have had a recent history of assaulting members of the SFSU campus community.

Students were cited with violation of CA Penal Code 626.4, which restricts [bars] students from coming onto campus for fourteen days. They have fourteen days to appeal the citation, but the University is blocking students from entering the appeals process by claiming they are booked until mid-May. This comes at a time when students nationwide are undergoing oppression for protesting, including students at University of California Santa Cruz, whose protest Tuesday forced recruiters to pack up early and leave their campus.

Students Against War [a chapter of the Campus Antiwar Network], an antiwar student group not rooted in any political ideology, organized the pre-rally and speakers and faces possible disbandment depending on today’s events. This is because they are under preexisting sanctions for the protest that occurred March 9, 2005, in which students effectively chased recruiters off campus.

“I feel completely repressed and violated because I was forcibly removed for expressing my right to free speech and protest,” said Karen Knoller, SFSU freshman who was cited. “In addition to being barred from my classes, I have also effectively been made homeless, as I currently live in campus housing.” Knoller and two other students cited at SFSU, largely a commuter school, also live on campus.

“What am I going to do? I have a paid apartment on campus and I can’t go to it. Am I paying them so I can just sit on 19th and Holloway?” asked Chris Velasco, student at San Francisco State University. “I have a right to protest. My brother is in Iraq fighting.”

SFSU is a university with a legacy of protests, starting with the student strike of 1968. The students demand that they be allowed to practice their rights to free speech and their right to protest, and that they be allowed back on campus to attend classes, visit their dorms and attend their antiwar meetings.

The students will be holding a press conference at the intersection of 19th Avenue and Holloway, just outside the university, 11:00 AM on Monday, April 17. At this event, students will discuss their legal defense and the appeals process to the university.

###

This violation of the free speech of students at SFSU is outrageous!
Call or email President Corrigan and demand that the 10 students
suspended today be allowed back on campus!

President Robert Corrigan
(415) 338-1381
corrigan@sfsu.edu